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Astrophotography can be technically challenging. But these 5 must have astrophotography apps will help you along the way.

Your iPhone will become your best Milky Way photography buddy.

Equipped with these apps, your Apple device will help you understand, navigate and photograph the night sky.

1. Sky Guide App

Screenshot of the Sky Guide astrophotography apps

This app has everything you need. Whether you are into stargazing or a keen amateur astrophotographer.

Sky Guide is the perfect companion to let you know what happens in the sky. Everywhere you are, any time you want.

Developed by Fifth Star Labs, this app got a major update that made it even more awesome.

iPhone | Android

Let’s look at what it offers more in-depth.

Sky Map and Augmented Reality

Screenshot of the classic sky view compared to the new augmented reality function in the Sky Guide astrophotography apps

The classic sky view compared to the new augmented reality function.

The app has a clean interface showing you a classic view of the night sky. You can navigate it and zoom in and out.

You can also navigate through time. The app will show the sky as it will be (or was) on a specified date, time and location.

This is great for planning but has little use in the field. Once out and about though, you can activate the compass.

The app will use the gyroscopic sensors in your phone and GPS data to determine what you’re pointing your phone at. The app will then adjust the sky view accordingly.

This makes it easy to know what you are looking at. The latest version also comes with augmented reality.

This allows you to place the sky map on top of the scene your smartphone camera is framing.

Preferences and Siri Integration

In the preferences menu you can set the amount of information the app will display.

You can also switch to night vision mode. The app will use a black and red interface that’ll be easier to read.

A screenshot of the night vision mode in Sky Guide astrophotography app

The General and Preference menu together with the view of the sky with the night vision mode activated.

There is also Siri integration. You can create your vocal shortcut, and point the phone to the sky. Siri will tell you what is visible in that direction.

Info Database

The app has a huge database where you can look up information on a particular object. This could be a planet, the moon, a galaxy, a nebula, etc.

You can navigate different categories or search objects by name or classification. For example, you can find the Orion Nebula by looking for Orion nebula or M42.

You can even save your favorite targets, to find them even faster.

Screenshot of the searchable database in Sky Guide.

The searchable database in Sky Guide.

The app also comes with generic info about possible targets. As well as the time they will rise, peak and set in the sky, apparent magnitude and apparent size.

Astrophotography apps screenshot showing the info panels for the Great Orion Nebula (M42).

The info panels for the Great Orion Nebula (M42).

Featured Contents and Calendar

Featured content includes astronomy tips and articles collected from the internet.

Screenshot of the Featured menu on SkyGuide astrophotography app

The Featured menu.

Then there’s the calendar of notable future astronomical events. These include planet conjunction, eclipses, moon phase, comets etc.

In the “Tonight” tile of the calendar, you will have a series of useful information:

  • Moon Phase and Rising/Setting time;
  • Moon and Planet Visibility;
  • Weather forecasts for your location;
  • Information about Satellite and International Space Station transits;
  • Light pollution information for your location;
  • and a light pollution map.
Screenshot showing the Calendar Menu shows plenty of interesting and useful information

The Calendar Menu shows plenty of interesting and useful information

Alternative Use In Astrophotography

I’m an astrophotographer without a GoTo mount. So I often use this app to navigate towards my target of choice. This can be invisible to the naked eye.

You can use the accurate star map to match what you photograph, to help you to close in on your target. My target was the 21P Giacobini-Zinner comet, which was invisible to the naked eye.

You can use the accurate star map to match what you photograph, to help you to close in on your target. My target was the 21P Giacobini-Zinner comet, which was invisible to the naked eye.

Explore the Sky With Alternative Lights

The app allows you to see the sky with different kinds of light. These are: Radio, Microwave, Infrared, Hydrogen Alpha, Visible, UV, X-ray and Gamma-ray.

This is an amazing learning tool and can help you to plan in which light a target is best photographed.

The California nebula seen with different kind of lights in Sky Guide. The last image is a real photo I took in the visible light.

The California nebula seen with different kind of lights in Sky Guide. The last image is a real photo I took in the visible light.

This app is for iOS only and is not available for Android devices. A great alternative is Stellarium Mobile Sky Map.

Stellarium mobile sky map homepage - astrophotography apps

2. Dark Sky Finder

Screenshot of the Dark Sky Finder homepage - astrophotography apps

It is not easy to find a dark sky in the western world anymore. There’s too much light pollution.

Dark Sky Finder allows you to have a light pollution map over a normal map. This can use Map, Satellite and Hybrid display styles.

The map is based on the Bortle Scale. Different levels of darkness are color coded from black (darkest) to white (brightest).

The App has a database of dark sky locations. You can also add locations yourself and contribute to the app.

The about icon will show an great deal of info about the app and light pollution in general.

It is a great little app to plan your next astrophotography outing.

Dark Sky Finder interface and a rather complete help section - best astrophotography apps

Dark Sky Finder interface and a rather complete help section.

iPhone

3. Dark Sky Meter SEScreenshot of the dark sky meter SE app homepage

Dark Sky Meter SE uses the camera of your iOS device to measure the actual brightness of the sky in your location.

In the main screen, it displays controls to take a Sky Quality Meter (SQM) reading. It also shows info such as sunset time, darkness start and end times, sunrise, moon phase and device angle.

This way you’ll know how high above the horizon you are taking the measurement. For example, 90º corresponds to the Zenith.

Dark Sky Meter Astrophotography App Interface

The app is very simple to use:. Take a light measurement while covering the camera with your finger. When prompted, take a second measurement. This time point your camera towards the Zenith, directly above you.

The values are in SQM (Sky Quality Meter) and can be related to the Bortle Scale values.

This app is great to quantify the darkness of your location for further references. And to decide whether to add this place as a dark location in Dark Sky Finder.

These astrophotography apps are for iOS only. But there are alternatives for Android devices as well, such as Light Pollution Map.

iPhone

4. Clear Outside

A screenshot of the clear outside app for astrophotography

Clear Outside has a useful free little app by First Light Optics. It fetches and nicely display data from the darksky website.

The app can display a range of information for your current location or a specific one. There are the usual Sky Quality Metering and Bortle Scale Class, Moon phase, Moonrise, Moonset, Sunrise and Sunset.

The app also gives you information about seeing conditions, visibility and sky clearness. This includes the hourly amount of low, medium and high altitude cloud coverage. As well as temperature, dew point, wind direction and speed, chance of rain and so on.

The app also shows when the ISS (International Space Station) is passing over your location.

A screenshot of the clear outside app for astrophotography interface

This app as a rather crowded interface.

The interface is quite crowded with info. If you are not interested in the details, just look in the first column for the time on green background.

The visibility is color coded from green (good) to red (bad).

iPhone | Android

5. PS Align

Screenshot of the Polar Scope Align Pro homepage - best astrophotography apps

This app is quite useful if you are starting to use an equatorial mount. A good example of this is the Skywatcher Star Adventurer.

The most important thing in astrophotography is to have the best possible polar alignment for your mount. This allows you to expose for longer before running into tracking errors.

This app will show you how to properly align your equatorial mount based on Polaris’ position.

The app also displays your current latitude. This, in turn, tells you how to set the altitude for your tracking mount. The app includes a compass and a bubble level to help you level the mount and set the altitude.

With this app you don’t have to fiddle with data and time circles. All you have to do is replicate in your polar scope what you see on your phone screen.

The app allows you to dim the brightness of your screen to a rather low intensity. And it has a red interface, to save your eyes adaptation to dark.

You can also align the equatorial mount in daytime or when Polaris is not visible. This is thanks to the Daytime/No Polarscope Alignment function.

Make sure you read the info by tapping on the info symbol.

This method may not work for faint and small DSO targets. That’s because these require precise polar alignment.

But it should be good enough to allow you to photograph star fields, lunar surface close ups and planets.

Screenshot of the PS Align Daytime/no polar scope alignment and the astro calculator.

The extremely useful Daytime/no polar scope and the astro calculator.

Finally, there is also an astro calculator for when observing and or imaging. You can calculate magnification, field of view, etc., on the fly.

iPhone

Conclusion

There you go. The five best astrophotography apps for iOS. They will cover all your astrophotography needs.

Not all of them are free, but they are well worth their small price tag.

A note from Josh, ExpertPhotography's Photographer-In-Chief:

Thank you for reading...

CLICK HERE if you want to capture breathtaking images, without the frustration of a complicated camera.

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Thanks again for reading our articles!

Andrea Minoia

Andrea Minoia is an enthusiast photographer based in Brussels, Belgium. He is mainly active in portraiture and table top photography, but he does enjoy to get busy with astrophotography and infrared photography. You can follow his work on his regularly updated photo stream on 500px and follow him on google+.You can also get in touch with him via his personal website .

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