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Darktable vs Lightroom – Is Darktable Really Just as Good?

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If you are looking for cheap or even free editing software, we have the thing for you. We all love free stuff, but should we scrimp and save when it comes to post-processing?

To see if Darktable is any good, we are going to place it next to Lightroom to see if it can hold its own.

Atmospheric close up portrait of a raven - darktable vs lightroom

What Is Adobe Lightroom?

Lightroom was the second program, after Photoshop, that Adobe created for photographers. It allows you to complete non-destructive edits on your work.

The best thing about Lightroom is organization. This editing software lets you work from a catalog, keeping all of your edits neatly inside one LRCAT file.

Keywording and collections let you organize further. Flags, stars, and colors help the editing process remain swift when you need it.

Although not as all-encompassing as Photoshop, Lightroom lets you do most, if not all image editing. For layers, masks and heavy duty editing, you’ll need Photoshop.

There is no reason why you can’t use both Photoshop and Lightroom together. Exporting images from one to another is not only possible but very effective and simple.

What Is Darktable?

Darktable is a free editing software package. It is a free Lightroom alternative. It’s also open source and looks closer to a Lightroom bootleg than any other program.

When it comes to Raw file processing, it definitely works hard. It supports RAW files from over 400 different cameras.

Like Lightroom, its editing style is non-destructive, allowing you to keep the original file and revert back to it easily. There is no shortage of adjustments you can use either.

It has an array of exporting possibilities, so you are never short of places to share your images. You can export images straight to Facebook and Flickr, or send them directly in an email.

Something that Darktable has but Lightroom lacks (except in copying/pasting of settings) is automating repetitive tasks. This can speed up your editing process significantly.

If you would like to give it a try, downloads for Linux, Mac, and Windows are available here.

Screenshot of editing photos on darktable

Darktable vs Lightroom Comparison One – Interface

Lightroom Classic CC 2019

Lightroom’s interface is very easy to use. If you are used to Photoshop, Lightroom is a breath of fresh air.

Adobe Lightroom works from seven tabs called modules. The majority of your organization will take place in the Library module, and the editing will be done in the Develop.

It is easy to navigate, which most people will love. Lightroom cuts down the time usually spent on learning how everything works. It is intuitive and generally makes sense.

Everything is well spaced out, which allows you to navigate easily.

Darktable 2.4.4

Darktable’s interface is almost confusingly similar to Lightroom. You’ll notice this, down to the colors used and even the way everything is laid out.

First, you come to the first, empty page, otherwise known as ‘Lighttable’. You might miss the import tab, dropping down a menu. This is your first port of call.

The import was fast, about the same speed of Lightroom. The ‘Darktable’ tab is where you go for all the editing.

There is another tab named ‘Other’ where you’ll find the ‘map’, ‘slideshow’ and ‘tethering’ areas.

Darktable feels like it has MANY tools to use, and comes across cluttered and therefore confusing for the first time user.

For example, when you head over to the ‘Darktable’ tab, you’ll see all of the adjustment sliders that are possible. But, they don’t make sense in their structure. At least to me.

First, you are given the ‘contrast brightness saturation’ area. This is something I would come back to later. For me, exposure, cropping or orientation should come first.

There might be a way to change the layout, but it isn’t apparently obvious.

Screenshot of editing photos on darktable

Darktable vs Lightroom Comparison Two – Keywording

Lightroom Classic CC 2019

Lightroom is a beat when it comes to organizing your images. You can use folders, collections, smart collections and any number of ways to arrange your images, edited or original.

Keywords are also the backbone of the Lightroom catalog. These are what help to separate images from entire sessions, perfect for searchability.

Keywords can be applied during the import stage, which cuts down on the work later on. They can be added later in the Library module. The areas where you can do this is easily named and used.

The best thing here is that Lightroom gives you Keyword Suggestions, but also allows you to choose from Keyword Sets.

The Keyword list is located below, where clicking on one keyword takes you to that selection.

Darktable 2.4.4

In Darktable, the keywords are named ‘tagging’. This again could be a problem if you are predominantly using Lightroom. Inside the tagging area, you use ‘tags’.

Instead of adding them, you attach the tags to your images. You can double click on them instead, which adds them to the tagging window of the image.

I have two problems with this system. Firstly, there doesn’t seem to a very obvious way of finding images with a tag.

If I opened a library with hundreds of images and wanted to find all of those with ‘flowers‘ in them, I’m at a loss on how to do that.

I don’t see a keyword list that would take me to those selected images. Secondly, and this is why I appreciate Lightroom, there are no intuitive ideas used in Darktable.

If you highlight many images that don’t have the same keyword, the keyword used is shown alongside a ‘*’ icon.

This lets you know that the keyword is present in the selected image, yet not used amongst all of them.

Darktable needs to address these problems, otherwise, there is no comparison.

Screenshot of editing photos on darktable

Comparison Three – Processing

Lightroom Classic CC 2019

Overall, processing Lightroom is great. You can apply any adjustments you wish, using exposure, contrast and tone curve sliders.

For the more advanced photographers, you can play around with the colors found in the image. White balance would be the first port of call, moving on to using the HSL (Hue Saturation Luminescence) area

You’ll find all of these in the Develop module. This tab allows all of the tweakings, making it easy to use. What I like it that you can use before-and-after or X and Y modes.

These allow you to compare images together, showing you the edits you have applied, or trying to mimic the edits across a series of work.

The second thing I love about Lightroom during the processing stage is the Create Virtual copy option. This lets you duplicate the image you’re working on.

This is beneficial for a number of reasons. It lets you have a few different edits of the same image, such as a color and then a black and white. You might be torn between two monochrome revisions.

Darktable 2.4.4

If you have used Lightroom before, this might actually be a negative point. I use Lightroom all the time, and the interface forces me to think I’m still using Lightroom.

Because of this, it takes me longer to find things. It might be the same for you. If you haven’t used Adobe Lightroom before, your learning curve will be shorter.

Darktable is different in what it can and can’t do in comparison. It falls behind in the amount of detail it is able to retain. This comes across in the brightest and darkest areas in images.

You would expect this when comparing a relatively expensive product with one that is free. We will show this in the example below.

Comparison Four – Example Colour

This is the original image we will be working from.
A street view of yellow buildings before editing

Lightroom Classic CC 2019

Below, you can see the changes I made in Lightroom, editing the original image.

  • Shadows -100
  • Blacks -48
  • Clarity +38

A street view of yellow buildings after editing in Lightroom

Darktable 2.4.4

With the Darktable image, there are two huge problem areas I can see straight away. One is the nature of the black, and the second is the color of the lit areas.

First, the blacks are bleeding. The edit is much softer than the Lightroom version.  The edges aren’t sharp, and it feels like a mask over the image than actually changing the black areas and making them darker.

Second, the colors of the building are muted. Compared to the Lightroom version, the colors in Darktable are less punchy and less saturated.

NB: The problem with editing the same image across two different platforms is what to expect. There are two ways you can do this and show it effectively.

The first is to edit one image, and then edit the second image on the look. Here, you try to obtain the same exact edit and look at the areas that change in achieving that same result.

I tried the second way, using the same values as the first program. I doubted they would be identical, but I feel it gives a good idea of how the two programs would differ.

Everyone edits with their eyes, not with the setting values in mind.

A street view of yellow buildings after editing in Darktable - Lightroom alternatives

Comparison Five – Example Black and White

This is the original image we will be working from.

A street view of yellow buildings

Lightroom Classic CC 2019

Below, you can see the changes I made in Lightroom, editing the original image.

  • Exposure -0.12
  • Contrast +24
  • Highlights -100
  • Shadows -67
  • Blacks -40
  • Clarity +60

A street view of buildings, edited in Lightroom

Darktable 2.4.4

I wanted to show a black and white and color version of the same image across both platforms. The end result was much closer to what I had edited in Lightroom.

I find it harder to see which image I prefer. The Lightroom edit was punchier and showed more contrast. But, the Darktable edit kept the detail in the darker areas.

Again, I copied the settings over to see the difference, which is obvious. The sky has more mood, and the overall feeling is softer.

A street view of buildings, edited in Darkroom

Comparison Six – Pricing

If you are an avid user of Adobe products, you might be confused with their recent updates. A year or two ago, Adobe changed the majority of their programs to a Creative Cloud subscription process.

You’ll find that both programs are available across both computer platforms. I have only tried Darktable for Windows, where I am more used to photo editing on a Mac.

Lightroom Classic CC 2019

If you still use Lightroom 6 and feel like it’s finally time for an update, then you need to pay per month. You get many more updates, at no extra cost.

These can be difficult to keep up with, especially if you like to use tutorial videos. You might be looking for processes that have moved, changed or no longer exist.

The Creative Cloud has its benefits, but the big plus for Photoshop Elements is that it isn’t part of it. This might mean fewer updates, but a one-off cost is better than a monthly plan.

Right now, if you wanted to download and use Adobe Lightroom Classic CC, you need to pay a minimum of $9.99 a month. This is the Photography Plan option.

This does come with a simpler, more mobile version of Lightroom (CC), and 20 GB of cloud storage. You can opt for more storage, at an extra cost of $10 per month.

Advantages of Darktable

The biggest advantage of Darktable is that it is free. It is a worthy program for editing, and can dramatically improve your photography.

The next plus is that it is a cross-platform software. Not only does it work on Linux computer systems, but it is also an open source program.

This means that anyone from around the globe can contribute. I doubt Lightroom and Adobe take contributions from people, but rather fix the issues that the users have with the software.

There is much you can do here, but there is a learning curve.

Screenshot of using Darktable photo editing software - Lightroom vs Darktable

Disadvantages of Darktable

One of the big problems I have with Darktable is that it is too similar to Lightroom. This forces me to see where Darktable falls short, as things aren’t where they make sense to be.

I spend more time in Darkroom, floating through their ‘more modules’ drop-down menu, looking for things like ‘local contrast’. Lightroom is much faster.

On top of this, Lightroom can handle more than 50,000 images. Trust me, I have over that in one catalog. Darktable stammers along, not showing you if it is actually doing anything.

I expect this from a free program. The keywords are better in Lightroom, where I actively use them all the time. In Darktable, I find they wouldn’t benefit my work.

The biggest problem I have is the way this engine processes images. As you can see in the above examples, the editing was far from perfect. The two-color edits are worlds apart.

Both Lightroom and Darktable apply settings to your work, depending on your camera profile. This happens between the import and subsequent images appearing in your Library.

For me, Lightroom processes them much better. It might be because I use Canon, or because I shoot in raw, I’m not sure.

As a Lightroom alternative, Darktable just doesn’t cut it for me.

A person working editing photos at a laptop on a desk - Lightroom vs darktable

Conclusion

I really wanted to like Darktable. I am all for free programs that people create out of passion and not to make money. This editing software is a collaboration, created from the minds of many people.

Also, I love the fact that it works on Linux, so no one is stopped from using it. And, again, it is free. This is the biggest plus.

However, no one is going to take my Lightroom away. I have spent far too much time setting it up how I want it. My workflow is fast with Lightroom.

With Darktable, it would stagnate and turn me off editing for sure. Yes, there is much you can do with Darktable.

I might actually say too much. It can start to be very time consuming, which is the exact opposite of what I want from my editing software.

They both process raw images, so that’s a huge bonus. If you don’t like Adobe products, then you can use Darktable to convert your file formats and edit elsewhere.

Lightroom gives me what I want when I want it. It is no-nonsense and gets the job done in a timely fashion. Darktable needs more work.

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16 comments
  1. I am using Darktable for over 4 years now. I have always wondered whether I am missing something in terms of recovery (light, shadow) and whether I should venture into other software and give a shot. Being full time Linux user, except RawTherapee and Corel Aftershot Pro, my options are limited and I didn’t want to invest in Windows or Mac due to me doing software development on Linux (awesommeeeee…. coming from me doing software development for years, containers, etc… are breeze in linux).

    I liked your article and I guess, I am missing out some on post processing (highlight and lowlight recovery). In a way shortcoming of Darktable forces me to try to nail as much as possible during a shoot, but still there is little to fall back when outputs are not desirable after a photoshoot.

    Attached experimental shoot (scouting) image has extremely less post processing (except minor adjustments and cropping), used lee filters and other things instead.

    Thanks, appreciate it.

  2. Hi there! 🙂
    First of all I like that someone actually wanted to compare those two photo editing applications. And saying this up front: I am an ambitious amateur photographer and wholehearted linux geek, so I might be biased towards darktable. 😉 I used Lightroom a bit like probably ten years ago and seen it from time to time with friends using it, so I bet a lot changed there, too. That beeing said, I think this is a kind of unfair comparison (although you even point this out in the article). I don’t see where you provide the darktable settings which you applied. You say you copied over the values from Lightroom, but as you say you cannot expect completely different software to behave the same for the same values as they likelyuse different scales and ranges and different algorithms or at least different implementations. Secondly, some settings cannot even be converted to darktable as is. E.g. there is no such thing as Lightroom’s beloved “clarity” slider in darktable, but there is the “local contrast” module which gives you similar results and even more control (i.e. parameters) on how the underlying algorithm will work. So, I don’t see how you can compare the settings between both programs if there is not even an equivalence and it does not surprise me that the darktable edit is “softer” and the shadows look like a black mask in the color example compared to the Lightroom edit where you boost the clarity to +38.
    You are right: darktable’s interface might be misleading due to the similarity to Lightroom, but it works very differently. I feel that you can get almost every result as in Lightroom but it needs a different approach and learning. Some modules are IMHO just stunning and maybe superior to Lightroom (like the equalizer, retouch or filmic) and I really dig their user interfaces beeing different (better) then just simple sliders. Or the whole system of drawn and parametric masks combined with content aware feathering gives you superb control. It also improved quite a lot in performance with growing OpenCL support utilizing graphic cards.
    But to be honest: As with a lot of the Open Source software it gives you a lot of control and options to achieve similar results in different ways but it also makes it easy to be overwhelmed and shoot yourself in the foot while fiddling around.
    I would be really interested in comparing edits of both programs trying to mimic the style of someone who is profound in the one tool and vice versa. Maybe you would like to provide some edits together with the RAW files? 🙂

  3. Sorry, but this is a pretty bad review. I guarantee you darktable can do much, much better than what you show. Your basic premise is that it does a bad job processing yet you admit you haven’t used it much and know lightroom well. Review some excellent videos on youtube and in no time you’ll be as fast and have as equally good results as LR. Just look at photo site like Flickr and search darktable and you’ll see exceptional images. Give your raw photo in Comparison 4 to someone who knows darktable well and see what they can do – you’ll be amazed at the results.

  4. It doesn’t seem fair to rate a product that you’re unfamiliar with on the basis that you’re finding it more diffcult to use than one you are familiar with. I am looking into using darktable and so far it’s not too bad, there are a few weaknesses for example I have not found a way to align images for HDR. Noise reduction seems a tad complicated, but other than that it ain’t too bad. Practice makes perfect as the saying goes.

  5. As a Darktable and GIMP user I had an opportunity to use Lightroom and Photoshop last year.

    Darktable IMO shines if one needs a full control. It exposes all available parameters and offers a number of ways to achieve the same end results. Whether it’s converting to black and white, sharpening, denoising… Even perspective correction can be done in two different modules. I can understand your frustration if the most intuitive approach doesn’t deliver what you are used to from Lightroom or other raw developers. It doesn’t mean that identical or perhaps even better results cannot be achieved, but they may require more study time.

    On the other hand styles and automatically applied presets can be used to speed up ones workflow dramatically and have it fully customized.

  6. You hardly make a fair comparison of darktable to LR. It’s not DT’s fault that you are steeped in LR and, as a new DT user find the interface confusing. Your DT editing effort falls pathetically short because you do not know how to use the program to properly process your image. Used properly, DT can probably do a better job than LR because of its powerful masking abilities that allow you to quickly and accurately select specific areas of the photo that need adjustment. You cannot do that in LR. I use both applications and find them both worthy. You use only one and denigrate the other. Why?

  7. I agree with many people above how you compared 2 products even you don’t have half clue what DT is capable of, for example some killer featrure like parametric mask.

    I found a video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZVqd0BJEfs (not mine), this comparison seems to be a more fair and comprehensive comparison.

    I do agree DT has a much deep learning curve though.

  8. The only downside in darktable I see in the usability for beginners. Many tools do similar things and it is sometimes confusing. The Interface should be updated and made more intuitive.

    Another downside I see in darktable is update for the lens correction or camera support. Non of my two lenses are listed in the lensfun database and as windows user I don’t see any way to update it easily. There has to be a more simpler update process and updates should be provided at a faster pace.

  9. I am torn between darktable and Lightroom. Perceptive-wise, Lightroom brings results faster. Technology-wise, darktable heads the race.
    darktable embraced the Linux motto: there you are, tons of uncorrelated tools, go figure yourself.
    I too think this article lacks grounding because of – to begin with – the different color spaces in use by Lightroom (ProPhoto RGB) and darktable (L*a*b). There you find all the reasons for different color appearance.
    Lens correction in darktable is honest – just download the newest catalog from lensfun and copy them to the respective install folder (beware of the version=1 header!).
    darktable had parametric masks long before Lightroom users could think of them, and even today they are more powerful.
    darktable’s equalizer and pass filters, gosh, they are guns if you know how to use them.
    I find less trouble in assigning metadata and gpx tracks with darktable than with Lightroom. And darktable’s responsiveness on Linux system is miles ahead of Lightroom’s performance on Windows machines.
    For the downside, yes there are some, color manipulation and tonal adjustments are more the domain of Lightroom. Glows arrive easily even at the slightest push of highlights and shadows. darktable’s three de-noising modules are still a mess. darktable’s sharpening – activated by default – does not yield proper feedback such as in Lightroom; think of LR’s sharpening mask. darktable users know Lightroom’s sharpening as the highpass filter applied with overlay. But brace yourself: which common wo/man on earth would research the web or consult scientific literature just for this very simple question?
    What’s that fuzz with darktable’s color module so that I can’t adjust magenta and red separately???
    And why do I find the white point hidden in highlights and shadows whereas the black point resides in the exposure module? Because color theory commands so!
    Hence, darktable does not loose in terms of technology or color rendition, it just lacks usability, guidance, and a more elaborate manual since not any here-and-then photographer wants to eat tons of scientific articles in order to rake the last micron from the sensor. If darktable’s developers would segment the UI into an amateur level with guided and automated modes and into an can-do-all-expert mode, Lightroom would have had a very hard time.
    Just my 5+1 cents 🙂

  10. “It doesn’t seem fair to rate a product that you’re unfamiliar with on the basis that you’re finding it more diffcult to use than one you are familiar with.”
    I think this hits the nail on the head, I think if we want to read about comparisons and make a desicion then many reviews need to be read.
    Thank you for reviewing this and being honest with your biases though, will be reading a fair few more reviews before I decide which direction to go!

  11. A late reply, sorry 🙂

    I have been a LR user since v3. I love the program, it replaced a workflow that used more than a dozen programs with a single program. LR is a very good program and I have over 30,000 images in the catalogue. However, I don’t like the new subscription model and won’t have anything to do with it – which means I am stuck on v6.

    I decided that the way forward is to run a dual boot set up with win 7/LR6 for all my older images and Ubuntu/Darkroom for new images. I spent this weekend installing the Linux setup and pouring over the Darktable manual and watching over 50 tutorial videos.

    My conclusion, in contradiction to this review, is that Darktable is not some cheap alternative for the impoverished, it is a more powerful and sophisticated product than LR. The price of this is that is tends towards complexity in a similar way that Photoshop is complex. Darktable almost combines aspects of LR and PS but all within the non-destructive editing domain.

    This review, I think, suffers from lack of familiarity with Darktable. Most, if not all, of the criticisms go away once you are familiar with Darktable. Many of the criticisms actually are flat out wrong and the result of user error/misunderstanding rather than failings in DT. Reviews of software often suffer from this problem, especially reviews of alternatives to established market leaders. I don’t blame the reviewer for falling into a common trap but it does a serious disservice to Darktable, which is a remarkably powerful product.

    I think that commercial products have to tread a fine line between simplicity and complexity to appeal to the widest audience. Darktable is not a commercial product and the developers have gone all out for sophisticated processing capabilities and sacrificed a degree of simplicity. Darktable has over 60 processing modules but many of them offer different takes on the similar tasks – you don’t have to use them all. Once you know the product you can simplify things a lot by making using of the Favourites tab to group your most used modules. You could reasonably work with no more than about a dozen modules, and still have more editing power than Lightroom to play with. The masking capabilities alone make the product unique amongst raw converters.

    One area where DT could be improved – and I’m sure it not a priority for the developers – is in the (shallow-minded) first impression the program gives. It could do with some refinement of the UI. The v3.00 release candidate I’m playing with goes some way to polish things but it could refined further. One of the superficially impressive things about LR is the effort that has gone into the look of the UI. Linux products always suffer a little in “first impressions” because they never quite seem to have the visual kerbside appeal of top software for Windows and Mac. Trivial, yes, but possibly influential for new or experimenting users and something that might influence reviewers to avoid epithets like “cheap” to describe a program that is under the skin very sophisticated.

    I shall continue to use LR and DT in parallel but don’t let this review give you a wrong impression of Darktable. It is a product that rewards – and deserves – serious concentrated effort to understand its workflows and capabilities because it has the power to edit your images beyond what Lightroom can do. But only once you have learnt the program properly.

  12. Nice review. It just reassured me that the main and only advantage of opensource is that they are free. If you are professional, you use professional software, for which you have to pay. But I think it is worth its price.

    1. @Arek – Given that the vast majority of the internet’s infrastructure runs on open source / free applications I think there is a little more benefit that you seem to recognise.

      Just a thought – at one time a ‘professional’ got paid for their services – now it seems a ‘professional’ is expected to pay more for anything they use.

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['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
[index]
[index]
[i]
[i]
[type='text']
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[activeKey]
[activeKey]
['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
[index]
[index]
[i]
[i]
[type='text']
[type='text']
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[type='password']
[activeKey]
[activeKey]
['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
[index]
[index]
[i]
[i]
[type='text']
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[type='password']
[activeKey]
[activeKey]
['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
[index]
[index]
[i]
[i]
[type='text']
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[type='password']
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[activeKey]
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['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
[index]
[index]
[i]
[i]
[type='text']
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[activeKey]
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['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
[index]
[index]
[i]
[i]
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['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
[index]
[index]
[i]
[i]
[type='text']
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['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
[index]
[index]
[i]
[i]
[type='text']
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[activeKey]
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['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
[index]
[index]
[i]
[i]
[type='text']
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[type='password']
[type='password']
[activeKey]
[activeKey]
['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
[index]
[index]
[i]
[i]
[type='text']
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[type='password']
[type='password']
[activeKey]
[activeKey]
['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
[index]
[index]
[i]
[i]
[type='text']
[type='text']
[type='password']
[type='password']
[activeKey]
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['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
['rmockx.RealPlayer G2 Control', 'rmocx.RealPlayer G2 Control.1', 'RealPlayer.RealPlayer(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealVideo.RealVideo(tm) ActiveX Control (32-bit)', 'RealPlayer']
[index]
[index]
[i]
[i]