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Light painting is a fun and creative way to photograph at night time. It doesn’t take much to capture interesting light painting images that you’ll want to share.

Follow our article and read our light painting tips and techniques. You’ll be photographing scenes and people at night with confidence in no time.

A man standing on rocks at night and attempting light painting photography

Why You Should Be Doing Light Painting Photography

In short, light painting is a fun, easy way of getting some very cool photos.

You don’t need to spend hours looking for a cool location. You can do light painting photography anywhere.

So follow my step by step guide to take great light painting photography.

What Is Light Painting Photography?

The light painting techniques involve opening your camera’s shutter. It has to be long enough for you to ‘paint’ in the dark with a light source. This can be a torch or lantern, effectively painting with light inside the photo.

Be sure not to confuse light painting with light graffiti, which is very similar. The main difference is that you’re using the light source as the subject. You’re not using it to paint light onto a dark scene.

What Do You Need for Light Painting?

You will need the following items to begin light painting:

  • A camera that you can set to manual;
  • A tripod to hold the camera steady;
  • A dark location;
  • A light source to paint the scene;
  • A remote for your camera’s shutter to minimise camera shake (optional).

Dramatic light painting on a beach

Getting Started With Light Painting

The first thing you want to find is a good, dark location. Light painting photography needs darkness to allow the light to shine through.

Light painting adds to the interest of a photo; finding a location worthy of such a photo shouldn’t be too hard. For my first shot, I’ve chosen the breakwater on my local beach at low tide.

The next thing you’ll need to do is set up the shot:

Once you’ve found a suitable position for your tripod – focus. I would bring a lantern along with me for painting with. Place it about a third of the way into the scene, then manually focus on it.

The reason I use manual focus is simple. Autofocus has a lot of trouble focusing exactly where you want it to in these conditions.

If you have live view, I recommend using it now. You can digitally zoom 10 times in on what you want to focus on and have it displayed a lot larger. This allows for more accurate focus.

Atmospheric light painting shot of a wooden structure outdoors at night

The next step is to set your camera settings. That would be your ISO, shutter speed and aperture.

Because the exposure is quite long, you don’t want the ISO to be too high or the photo will come out looking grainy.

I like to set mine to 400 as it allows me the sort of detail I’m looking for in the sky even though I’m not painting onto it.

The shutter speed depends on how much light I’m working with but my main ‘go to’ speed is about 30 seconds. That said, it can be as slow as a few seconds in the right conditions.

You might decide to choose ‘Bulb’ mode. This is because it gives you the most control over the exposure time.

Here, you want to use a shutter release cable on your mirrorless or DSLR cameras.

Finally, I usually stick the aperture on about f/5.6. This allows for the depth of field I’m looking for. But it doesn’t let too much light into the camera. And I can still use a long shutter speed.

For the first demonstration in light painting photography I’m going to be using torches. In the second demonstration, I use flashes.

Light Painting Photography with Torches

You are creating a long exposure photograph.

From a couple of test shots, I decided that shooting down the breakwater didn’t give the effect I was looking for.

Have a look at the photo below and you’ll see what I mean: the torches I had with me didn’t do the job. Also, it’s pretty hard to stand in the frame and paint at the same time.

You end up casting a lot of shadows and the camera is likely to pick up the ends of the torches. This results in this unwanted, messy effect.

Shot 1

A light painting shot of a wooden structure

A much more effective way of light painting is to choose a certain area. This would be an area in the frame that you want to highlight and only paint part.

In the next two shots, I chose a part of the foreground to paint and played around with that for a little bit. This is a great idea and one of the best light painting photography tips.

You can see the sky is lighter than black due to the ambient light. It can either be from moonlight or light pollution.

Shot 2

The combination of the torchlight and the lantern blocked by the breakwater felt unbalanced. So I decided that this still wasn’t the light painting shot I was after.

Atmospheric light painting shot of a wooden structure outdoors at night

Atmospheric light painting shot of a wooden structure outdoors at night

I moved down the beach a little for my next shot and pointed my camera inland.

One of the great things about light painting at night is that you can play around with your white balance and it doesn’t even matter. You can make the colours whatever you want.

If you want to be successful at light painting photography, consider your environment.

Shot 3

Here, the sky is orange due to light pollution in the area. But the sand has a violet hue because I changed the white balance to white fluorescent light.

This makes the photo look like it’s from another planet which can be a lot of fun to play around with.

A brightly colored light painting shot of a wooden structure outdoors at night

As I walked around on the beach, I noticed this dynamic asymmetry. It had been staring me in the face for the past 20 minutes.

Shot 4

The key features in the photo below are symmetric. And the surrounding objects in the scene balance the photo with their asymmetry.

For the first photo with this light painting setup, I used the lantern as a light drawing source. This cast some interesting shadows around the photo. This was taken at ISO 400, f/5.6 at 30 seconds.

A light painting shot of a wooden structure outdoors at night

I really like this photo. But it is lacking the real light painting effect I’m after.

For my final shot, I used the same settings but this time shined a torch onto the centre support.

The darkness is still balanced by the shadows on the outer beams and behind the rocks. But you get a real sense of light painting photography and it looks a lot more striking now.

The overall effect is similar to that of an HDR (high dynamic range) photo. But without the unnecessary over-saturation HDR often comes with.

Shot 5

When I’m capturing light painting photography, I like to walk around the subject. I point the torch from all different angles to really make it stand out.

Here’s my finished photo.

For a great light painting tutorial tip, make sure you light the object from all sides.

A light painting shot of a wooden structure outdoors at night

As you can see, it’s easy to take an otherwise ordinary, everyday scene and make it much more interesting with the use of light painting photography.

I recommend taking whatever portable light sources you have and going out with a friend one evening. It can be a lot of fun.

Shots 6 & 7

Here are a few more examples of light painting photography created with torches. The first was shot at ISO 100, f/4 at 30 seconds and the second at ISO 100, f/3.5 at 30 seconds.

The first tip on how to do light painting is to make sure you have enough light sources for your environment.

A light painting shot of a wooden structure outdoors at night

A light painting shot of a wooden structure outdoors at night

Of course, you don’t have to only use torches – you can get very interesting light painting effects using an external flash.

Light Painting Photography With External Flashes

Here are the basics of how light painting with an external flash works.

The flash from a camera freezes the scene. In a dark situation, objects illuminated during the flash are the only ones the camera will see.

To layer a photo, add more flashes – this allows capture of movement.

Shot 1

In my first example below, I set off 4 flashes on to a moving swing to capture it exactly how I wanted it. This took a lot of trial and error to get the timing, angle of the flash and speed of the swing all correct.

One of the best light painting techniques is to use external flashes. They will help you in your aim in achieving light painting effect.

ISO 320, f/5.6 at 15 seconds with 4 flashes.

A light painting shot of a swing set moving at night

Shot 2

Another light painting idea I had was to add a person into the photo and capture their movement. Again, this took a little trial and error but less so than the previous shot as I was more used to it.

The same settings are used here as in the above photo.

A light painting shot of a man spinning on a roundabout at night

Shot 3

Have a look at these last two photos. You can see that I actually walked around the photo setting off flashes, lighting up the scene from different angles.

The light from the flashes become an important element of these photos. It is as important as the subject itself. Painting with light photographs tends to show light sources.

For the first of the two photos, I added movement to the roundabout. This makes the photo more interesting and shows how the light painting photography effect works.

For the second photo, I lowered the flash. It actually ended up being one of my favourite photos of the night. The reflections on the roundabout made it look like a stage.

A light painting shot of a roundabout at night

A light painting shot of a roundabout at night

As I hope you can see by now, there aren’t any real rules to light painting. It’s a case of taking the time and effort and having fun.

Try and experiment with your light painting photos. Add different coloured flashes along with glow sticks and lasers into the mix.

How I Used Light Painting Photography With a Model

The concept for this photo was to make it appear as though the same girl was in several places at the same time.

There are a couple things to note before we get started: the model I used was an absolute pro but I still had to be quick as it was freezing outside and she was sitting on a metal roundabout.

It was also dark, making the shot hard to compose. Before I show you where I started, have a look at my final image:

A female model posing on a roundabout for long exposure light painting photography

Shot 1

Below is my first image. As you can see, there’s plenty wrong with.

For a start, the model is only in the photo twice and they completely overlap. There’s also too much dead space at the top of the photo and it’s off centre.

The settings used for this photo were ISO 320, f/5.6 for 4 seconds.

The first thing I noticed is that 4 seconds was nowhere near long enough to get the photo I wanted. I increased that to 15 seconds for the rest of the photos.

This will allow the model to appear more than twice in the photo and for the flash to appear from more angles.

A female model posing on a roundabout for long exposure light painting photography

Shot 2

For my next shot, I used a longer shutter speed. This allowed me to move the model around the image more times without having to worry too much about the time.

I also straightened up the image a little and angled the camera down.

Even with the longer shutter speed, I didn’t pay enough care and attention as to where exactly the model was positioned when I set off the flashes.

Because I had the extra time, I ended up setting off too many flashes. These have made the photo quite messy. For the rest of the photos, I decided to stick to three carefully chosen positions.

Another couple of things I noticed were that I didn’t step far enough back when setting of the flashes. You can clearly see my foot on the left.

The photo is still not quite symmetrical… time to take another photo.

A female model posing on a roundabout for long exposure light painting photography

Shot 3

This third photo is a step in the right direction but with 3 main flaws.

The most obvious of these is the red line running across the middle of the photo.

This came from the light on my flash, indicating that it was ready to set off another strobe of light. I need to keep this covered in future or it’ll ruin the shot.

Secondly, and less noticeable to most, there’s still too much dead space at the top of the photo. I need to either zoom in or recompose the shot.

Finally, the model doesn’t stand out enough which comes from not enough light in the photo.

The best way to counter this is to set off more flashes for each position – previously it was one or two.

A female model posing on a roundabout for long exposure light painting photography

Shot 4

Finally, I managed to frame the shot how I wanted it. I did so by zooming in by 4mm in focal length (if you want to understand focal length better, click on that link).

Now this is a big improvement. The whole composition is a lot better and the positioning of the model is nearly perfect.

The positioning of the model in the center still isn’t quite to my standards. And there’s not enough light on her in the other two positions.

It’s time to go back and take one more shot.

A female model posing on a roundabout for long exposure light painting photography

This is much more like it.

Whenever I start out with a photo, I like to picture the best result I could hope for in my mind and this is it.

Shot 5

Considering how the model is sitting, having her head off centre helps with the balance of the photo as her legs go off to the right of the frame. It also means that she’s not overlapping the other exposures of herself.

In post-production, I slightly increased the exposure and did a tiny amount of cropping, just to satisfy my eyes.

Now that I’m done, I hope you like it!

A female model posing on a roundabout for long exposure light painting photography

And now check out this cool video on light painting!

A note from Josh, ExpertPhotography's Photographer-In-Chief:

Thank you for reading...

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Hey I'm Josh, I'm Photographer in Chief here at ExpertPhotography, and I'm in charge of making sure that we provide you with the best content from the most knowledgeable photographers in the world. Enjoy the site :)

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